Progs 485 to 488 – Atlantis

Story: Atlantis
Appears: 2000AD Progs 485-488
Issues: 4
Writers: John Wagner and Alan Grant
Art: Brendan McCarthy
Dated: 30 August 1986 to 20 September 1986

This is a great little murder mystery/ thriller with some complex motivations. It is an unusual setting and introduces a Brit Cit Judge too. The art is also noteworthy because of some thumbnail sized panels.

Progs 472 to 473 – Riders On The Storm

Story: Riders On The Storm
Appears: 2000AD Progs 472-473
Issues: 2
Writers: John Wagner and Alan Grant
Art: Brendan McCarthy & Tony Wright
Dated: 31 May 1986 to 7 June 1986

There is an element of Scooby Doo as Dredd unmasks ghosts which aren’t really supernatural. There isn’t much emotional impact or even suspense here. What is interesting is the rainy setting, something seen only rarely in a city where weather is controlled by computer.

2000AD Annual 1979 – Dr Panic

CF03Story: Dr Panic
Appears: 2000AD Annual 1979
Writers: (uncredited writer)
Art: Brett Ewins and Brendan McCarthy
Dated: 1979

This is uncredited and probably justly so as although there are plenty of Dredd elements, such as Walter and Max Normal, the whole thing lacks any kind of sparkle. Dredd utters nonsense about how synthetic caffeine is illegal and Max Normal speaks far too normally.

The premise of a suicide arcade where people risk their lives against deadly slot machines was done better as “You Bet Your Life” in Prog 25. This has a longer page count than usual but doesn’t do anything notable with it.

Prog 89 to 108 – The Day the Law Died!

CF02Story: The Day the Law Died!
Appears: 2000AD Prog 89-108
Issues: 20
Writers: John Wagner
Art: Mike McMahon, Brett Ewins, Brendan McCarthy, Brian Bolland, Gary Leach, Ron Smith
Dated: 4 November 1978 to 14 April 1979

This is another of those classic epics that make Judge Dredd such a joy to read. Following straight after the mighty Cursed Earth saga this tale put Mega City One well and truly through the wringer.

The three issues preceding this, in which Dredd is framed for murder but catches a robot duplicate of himself, are part of this story but are given separate titles. Maybe no one knew how big this story was going to get.

A new chief judge takes over who happens to be a raving lunatic styled in the vein of the Roman Emperor Caligula. He is the perfect villain. Wielding authority over the whole of the city he has infinite resources at his disposal, including the Judges. If Dredd has a weakness it would be the law and turning the law against him is an emotionally brutal weapon. Forcing Dredd to rebel against the city he loves and kill his fellow judges is the ultimate test of his character.

Because Chief Judge Cal is raving mad he is totally unpredictable. You can’t anticipate his methods, his goals or his strategy as it changes from moment to moment. He can’t be reasoned with as he has no reason. This also adds a wonderful surrealism to the whole storyline as a goldfish is made deputy chief judge, judges are forced to perform their duties in their pants and Cal makes many of his proclamations from the bathtub. There is a beautiful Monty Python vibe about the whole thing.

It makes great use of existing characters such as Judge Giant and the one-eyed principal of the Academy of Law who is finally named as Judge Griffin. We are also introduced to another of Megacity’s classic personalities, Fergee.

The tone of the piece is perfect and Dredd is constantly on the back foot waging a desperate resistance fight against overwhelming odds. But even in the midst of a life or death struggle he still makes time to stop and arrest petty criminals showing that Dredd truly is the law.

There are six different artists working on the 111 page spectacular. Whilst the transition could be jarring you are so engrossed in the story and so familiar with many of the names and styles that it does not trouble you. We do see the first appearance of Brett Ewins who has an ultra-clean style similar to Bolland’s which contrasts with the traditional rugged look of previous Dredd artists. There are a lot of powerful expressions, particularly from the contorted scowl of Cal as his madness twists him.

One of the best villains and best storylines ever seen.

Dredd Innocent. All Charges Dropped

CF02Despite damming photographic evidence Judge Dredd has been cleared of two counts of murder. Presenting the head of a robotic replica directly to the Council of Five as proof he had been framed Dredd was acquitted by Chief Judge Goodman.

Why and who perpetrated this incident is still unclear but speculation is rife that it was an inside job.

Dredd was heard to say “You came after my head – instead I got yours.”

Story: Bring Me the Head of Judge Dredd!
Appears: 2000AD Prog 88
Issues: 1
Writers: John Wagner
Art: Brendan McCarthy
Dated: 28 October 1978